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  Weight Limits
  Posted by: whopperman02 on Jul-01-13 11:30 PM (EST)
   Category: Kayaks 

-- Last Updated: Jul-01-13 11:46 PM EST --

I am thinking of purchasing a kayak for ponds and slow rivers. Some that I am looking at have a weight limit of 250lbs. I am 235-240lbs. If I bring gear with this will be in any touble with eight limit.


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Messages in this Topic

 

  Possibly. When a kayak is overloaded,
  Posted by: ezwater on Jul-02-13 4:14 PM (EST)
it kind of wallows in the water. A "rec" kayak is usually used without a spray skirt, so if it sits deeper, wave water can slosh inside more easily. Obviously, a kayak loaded past its recommended weight limit will be slower, and will turn more slowly.

I have some whitewater kayaks, and I'm usually at the upper limit of their weight capacity. So, they don't perform as well, but they don't feel totally handicapped. If you and I were looking at hulls right now, I'd be able to suggest those that are more likely to be able to bear an overload.

You might also be looking at cheap boats to save money. The only recreational kayak I tried was a 13' Old Town Otter, and it carried my 225# Ok, and clearly had capacity for a bunch of gear.

Sorry you haven't had other suggestions. People who might have helped are discussing the paddle craft market. ADHD. Let's ride bikes.
 
 
  Then again - there are the squirt boats
  Posted by: rpg51 on Jul-02-13 5:48 PM (EST)
and the people that love to paddle boats that are mostly underwater all the time. But, I doubt that is what your are interested in.
 
 
  Maybe, maybe not
  Posted by: pirateoverforty on Jul-02-13 5:57 PM (EST)
I am about your weight and have one boat with a 250 limit and I would be very selective about where when and how I paddled it. The boat won't sink just because you're 10# over buy there are plenty of boats with higher limits.
Tell us what boats are you looking at and you can get better advice
 
 
  There is a litle room for error
  Posted by: wolfmanrobby on Jul-03-13 8:49 AM (EST)
Like other people said, the more you weigh it down, the worse it performs. But, if you are like me and just like to paddle slow streams, lakes and ponds, don't care about hitting top speed, or trying to make a bunch of tight turns around rocks, you are fine.

I'm 335 lbs (Working on it! I'm down from almost 450!). I picked up one of the new Pelican Icon 120 Sit-On-Top boats from Academy Sports ($400). It has a 350 weight limit. So, that gives me 15 lbs for gear. Both times I've taken it out, you've had me, my pdf, paddle, spare paddle, a cooler with several bottles of water and my lunch, my safety gear... Honestly, about 360lbs+ and it's been fine. I just needed to plug the suppers with foam rubber practice golf balls ($3 for 4 @ walmart instead of $8 a pair for scupper plugs!).

I know a lot of people here are like I used to be and put down Pelican. But, they are not the same company they used to be. The Icon 120 is part of their new line under new management and a new design team. I was shocked! (I posted about it here: http://www.paddling.net/message/showThread.html?fid=chat&tid=1641698 )
 
 
  You'd still be better off in a canoe.
  Posted by: ezwater on Jul-03-13 10:58 AM (EST)
Check out Wenonah's fishing canoes. Stable, easy paddling, plenty of capacity. And a good canoe will hold resale value better.
 

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