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Advice, Suggestions and General Help New Topic Printer Friendly Version

  Angle of respose................
  Posted by: thebob.com on Jun-13-13 11:16 AM (EST)
 

-- Last Updated: Jun-13-13 11:21 AM EST --

When someone tells you what the perfect angle is; what they are really telling you is it's the perfect angle "for them". May or may not be perfect for you.

Start with a new set of seat hangers.
Cut 1/2 inch off to start canting the seat.
Reinstall seat, and take boat out & paddle it for a couple of hours.
Not the perfect angle for you?
Repeat the process; cut off another 1/2 inch & repeat the test.
When you find what you feel is the perfect angle "for you"; quit cutting.

You aren't going to find a "perfect" angle!
But if you want to be really compulsive about it; cut off 1/4 inch of the seat hanger at a time.

Be careful; make sure you don't lower any part of the seat too low. You want the seat high enough so that you can get your feet out from under the seat quickly if you capsize. That can be a problem for those with big feet, or those who wear stiff soled shoes. I speak from experience; getting dragged over a rocky shoal with one foot twisted/trapped under a too low canoe seat ain't NO fun at all! That happening at the wrong place & time could ruin the rest of your life.

Hint: Get a seat pad that buckles under the seat, and hangs over the leading edge of the seat. They help a lot.


BOB


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