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  I've done both...
  Posted by: rjd9999 on Feb-28-13 11:05 AM (EST)
 

Issues for me included the following:

- hooks - closed cockpit kayaks and barbed hooks seem to have a natural affinity for nylon straps; most open boats have more easily avoided straps
- still vs. moving water - in a river, it is simply easier to do a lot of the things you may need to do on an open boat, including the transition from fishing to paddling
- open ocean is where a closed boat has advantages, especially on the edges of a kelp forest where it is really easy to "anchor" yourself to the kelp; you do need a way to stow the rod safely (I use pvc elbow joints and bungee cords - I attach the elbow to the boat with the cords and jam the rod handle into the pipe - works amazingly well)
- many open boats have easy solutions and more options for holding the rod and tying down gear
- lures vs. bait - if you change lures or if you have to replace bait often, the open boat has a distinct advantage; in a closed boat you pretty much have to design a surface in front of you for cutting bait, holding the knife, etc.
- people talk about the stability of open boats a lot, but I've not had a problem with this in the closed cockpit; sure, you probably won't be standing up, but aiming or controlling a cast isn't any harder while sitting with a good sidearm cast (unless the lure finds a nice nylon strap to grab on to ): )

Rick

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