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Reviews for Delta 12.10 Kayak by Delta Kayaks


Rated: 9.23/10 Based On: 13 Reviews


Delta 12.10 Kayak by Delta Kayaks

Length: 12' 10" - Width: 25.00" - Starting at: $1450.00
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08-30-2013
Submitted by: Mark LibnerSend Email
Rating: 10 of 10

     My wife and I bought our second set of Kayaks this spring. We have enjoyed our "blow molded" 14 foot Kayaks for the past three years. However, we found that we wanted something lighter which we could turn faster when in rivers which were faster moving and required sharper turns.

The new Delta 12's, a follow on to the 12.10 fit the bill exactly. Although the 12.10 is an excellent Kayak and maybe a good choice for someone wanting a wide cockpit, both my wife and I wanted as narrow a cockpit we could get.
We had to wait three months for Delta to manufacture our Kayaks. As with any new model, until the "pipeline" is filled, if you want one, you have to order it.

On the water, the Delta 12s are a dream. They track almost as good as our 14 footers, are half the weight, outstanding seat system, excellent primary and secondary stability and "turn on a dime". We would highly recommend the Delta 12 for both a beginner or nice upgrade.

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08-08-2013
Submitted by: Send Email
Rating: 10 of 10

     The Delta 12.10 stands out against other kayaks of this length in every way. It's an amazing little craft that can do big things!

First, the stability is very impressive. It takes almost no skill to keep the Delta 12.10 upright in waves. The flared bow rides right up over waves easily. I barely even have to be attentive to waves coming from the side. I've had no problems at all with tracking. The speed is much better than you would expect for such a short kayak. The performance is on par with most 14 footers.

The 12.10 is a great choice for winding rivers and marshes as it turns very easily. But it's also very comfortable on large lakes in rough conditions, and I wouldn't hesitate to take it on the ocean due to its stability and safety features (perimeter lines and unique paddle straps that hold the paddle more securely than bungees).

I love this kayak for camping. The volume in the hatches is huge---about 30% larger than my 15.5' sea kayak. I can easily pack for a 5-day trip with the Delta 12.10. The hatches on mine are 100% watertight. I don't even pack things in dry bags; I just drop them in the hatches.

The seat is very simple in design, and yet one of the most comfortable I've owned, suitable for all-day trips. The cockpit opening is large enough for a fairly large person, and yet small enough to be in the sea kayaking rather than recreational class, meaning it doesn't admit tons of water. I'm 5'5" and the foot pedals can be moved down another 9" from where I have them set.

I can't say enough good things about the Delta 12.10. It's unique in its length class among thermoformed kayaks. Eddyline, Swift, and Hurricane don't have an equivalent to the Delta 12.10 in their line up, a short kayak that is seaworthy, stable, reasonably fast, and has enough volume for camping.

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08-01-2013
Submitted by: thsSend Email
Rating: 9 of 10

     I purchased my Delta 12.10 from Hellman Canoes in Nelson, B.C. over a year ago. Since they are located on Kootenay Lake I was able to try a number of kayaks before deciding on the 12.10. The staff were very helpful in assisting me as this was my first kayak.

I found the 12.10's primary and secondary stability very good and it tracked very well. The only difficult I had was with a wind on the stern quarter constantly trying to turn me into the wind. I have since learned how to handle that. I add Fit Kit supplied by Delta to allow me to control the 12.10 when I use a hip thrust (Not sure if that is the correct term).

A great kayak that will grow with you as your kayaking improves.

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07-29-2013
Submitted by: View Profile Send Email
Rating: 5 of 10

     I have fifty-seven years of paddling experience with nearly every configuration of boat and every fabrication material, from graphite outriggers, to ultralight Kevlar racing canoes, to roto-molded polyethylene surf/river kayaks to Royalex ABS "beater" boats. I took a chance buying a Delta Twelve-Ten kayak, made out of thermoformed plastic, believing the advertising that this material was as durable as polyethylene and as light and sleek as fiberglass.

Recently I mishandled the kayak unloading it from the car-top rack, and the bow dropped five feet, sustaining a foot-long crack, rendering the kayak totally dysfunctional. The accident was my fault. However, my $1,500 experiment with a new "miracle" kayak material has proven a failure; I would have expected much better impact resistance. One kayak dealer warned me against my purchase of this material for that very reason, and I should have heeded his advice.

Although the Delta is a stylish and nicely performing kayak, it is NOT impact resistant. I will not be buying another Delta kayak, nor any kayak made from thermoformed plastic, for that matter. Stay away from this kayak if you canít treat it delicately!

**MANUFACTURER'S RESPONSE**
"I'm very sorry to hear about the incident with your Delta 12.10. I can understand your frustration and disappointment especially since it sounds like you have not owned the boat for long.

Just to be clear, we have never advertised or claimed that our thermoformed kayaks are as impact resistant as polyethylene kayaks or that they are made from some kind of miracle material. White water kayaks are made exclusively from PE for this reason.

We do claim that our thermoformed material offers several advantages over both FG & PE kayaks. Generally they are more durable than fibreglass and also on average as light and often lighter (depending on the glass lay-up). They are usually much lighter than PE kayaks. They are much more resistant to warping and deformation than PE kayaks.

They are more abrasion resistant than either PE or FG and there is no gel coat to maintain or wear through so generally they require less maintenance. The hard outer surface stands up very well to beach landings. The material is also more UV resistant than either gel coated fibreglass or PE and will not fade or lose it's shine.

As far as direct impact goes they are generally quite tough but certainly not unbreakable. If the impact happens against a hard surface on a spot where the material cannot yield or flex then a break can occur. For instance, there was a instance where a roof rack came detached from a vehicle on a freeway. Two of the kayaks were thermoformed Delta's (a 12.10 and a longer model) the other boat was fibreglass. The two Delta's survived with only some road rash while the glass boat was a total write off.

You may have seen a popular YouTube video of a "hammer test" on one of our hulls. A standard carpenters hammer is used by a very strong man hitting the hull as hard as possible multiple times. The test is 100% authentic and unrehearsed. Of course he is hitting the bottom of the hull and not on the keel of the boat. Can you imagine what that test would have done to a fibreglass hull? So the point is, the material is very durable and tougher than most composites "but" if it is impacted just the right way in the wrong place it can break.

We have made thousands of kayaks over the years and continue to do so. Many of our customers are avid paddlers and outfitters that use the boats often and don't baby them. They know the material can handle a fair amount of abuse within reason. We have many repeat customers who own several of our boats and outfitters that have dozens.

There are many dealers who have all but eliminated composite kayaks from their inventory because of the high retail cost and the repair and maintenance issues. I'm not knocking composites kayaks. There are still some good manufacturers and they will always have a place in the industry.
The trucking companies have a higher freight class (more expensive) for composite boats than for our thermoformed boats because ours are considered a lower risk for damage.

A well known competitor of ours who historically made exclusively composite kayaks now make exclusively thermoformed kayaks from the very material we use. I doubt they would do this if the material was inferior. Obviously neither of us would be in business very long if the material did not perform.

If you dropped the boat from five feet onto (concrete?) as you say, and it landed directly on the keel where there is no flex then yes it "could" break although I am surprised the break is as large as it is.
Another advantage of the thermoformed material is the ease of repair. The boat can be easily repaired and will be very structurally sound once repaired. If you are interested we can send you a repair kit at no charge. It would be good to see a picture of the damage so we can assist you in a successful repair.

Hopefully we can be of some assistance and regain at least some of your lost confidence in the thermoformed material and most importantly our brand. Please let me know if there is anything else I can do."

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07-24-2013
Submitted by: Send Email
Rating: 9 of 10

     I just purchased the Delta 12.10. Firstly, the dealer, Frontenac Outfitters is awesome - they fit you to a couple models and then put you in the lake to try them out.

The 12.10 was much faster than the other models I tried, and tracked straight very easily without a skeg/rudder. Very efficient gliding through the water, even in 1-2 foot waves and some wind. The seat is very comfortable - I spent 2-3 hours in it with no discomfort at all, and the back gives great support without getting in the way of the paddling motion. It is easy to get great contact points at my feet, and thighs, and the kayak responds to subtle pushes with the feet or knees. I plan to get a fit kit installed to get tighter hip contact.

Initial and secondary stability make me feel very comfortable as newbie to kayaks. I was able to lay it on edge pretty comfortably within the first few outings. I will feel more confident in choppy lakes once I add a skirt. My back hatch seems to leak a bit, I will have that addressed by the dealer. What would make this kayak even better would be the day hatch like the 12s.

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02-27-2013
Submitted by: kerrySend Email
Rating: 10 of 10

     This is one sweet little kayak. I've been paddling kayaks for 35 years and have sat in and paddled many different boats from whitewater to seakayaks. I currently have 5 different kayaks in the 12 to 14 foot range but the Delta is my favorite.

The thermoformed plastic is strong and well made with a nice glossy appearance. Yes, all thermo boats scratch somewhat easily but there are good polishes that buff them out to look like new again (Novus makes a good one). I love the hatch covers, while in the water besides the boat it is easy to remove them to retrieve something from the bow or stern in an emergency on open water. There are plenty of deck lines and bunjis and the straps to hold down a paddle for a re-entry work very well...these should be standard on all sea-kayaks.

This kayak handles very well as a coastal boat in rough water. The high volume, flared bow parts the waves and prevents pearling as you ride a wave into the shore. Initial stability is excellent as well as the secondary stability due to the hard chines, this is a great combo for those like me who like to be able to use this as a "rec" boat on calm water one day and then play in the surf on Lake Michigan or catch and ride boat wakes the next. The sliding seat helps to get a good fit with the thin padded but adequate thigh braces. For me the seat fits well and is comfortable for hours at a time.

I take out a variety of people to paddle with me and the twelve 10 accommodates everyone from ten year olds to my 74 year old father(I weigh 128lbs and am 5'7" with a size 7 shoe). I paddle 5 to 20 miles several times a week from April till freeze up in the fall and the Delta gets used for at least half of my time (I'll use my Necky "manitou" on rocky rivers or exploring closer to rocky shorelines, I do a lot of scavenging...you'd be surprised at all the neat things you can find:)

Speed? while not the fastest boat on the block, it is adequate. I usually average about 3 to 5mph while paddling and that's good enough for me. Some reviews I've read mentioned problems trying to keep the kayak on a straight course... I've had no issues and I suspect it may be due to either lack of experience paddling a kayak without a rudder or skeg or the weight of the paddler and gear need to be centered better in the boat.

I get a lot of people asking me advice about kayaks and one thing novices are unsure and confused about is whether they should buy a longer seakayak or a shorter recreational/daytouring/weekend kayak. Be honest with yourself! Ask yourself where you are going to do most of your paddling and under what conditions? I bet most of the folks who buy a full fledged, longer seakayak would have been better served getting something a bit less glamorous and shorter. Yes that beautiful, long, skinny kayak that looks great in the showroom just may be a bit more of a boat than most of us need. IF you are planning on kayaking for more than say 20 miles a day or for trips of 3 days or longer, then yes a longer touring kayak of 16 to 18 feet may be what you need. A longer kayak generally means more volume which is needed for packing larger quantities and bulkier items on extended journeys. Also the longer hull will generally give you a bit better glide between strokes which will be more efficient in keeping a better line between destinations and less exhausting for the expedition paddler. If you expect to be encountering rough water and heavy surf over long distances then a seakayak 16 to 18 feet that is designed for such conditions would be essential. If most of your kayaking will be less than 20miles a day or maybe for a day or two on a camping trip then most so called day/weekend type kayaks about 12 to 15 feet in length will suit most folks just fine. And if you just want any old hull to keep tucked in at a lake cottage for occasional use, then any recreational boat will do the job (while saving you a lot of money too:). Still it all comes down to what YOU want. With experience and training you can paddle most any kayak in any situation. As you become more aware of your paddling skills and acquire better equipment you may end up specializing by having several boats or more which will be used in your different pursuits on the water (one for just fishing, one for camping, one for whitewater, one for speed, etc.) No matter what, just remember that the best kayak that you own is the one that you USE. If it sits in the garage cause it's too heavy or doesn't paddle quite right then get rid of it! Get something you truly like and that you will use more often because life IS short...get out and paddle!!

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08-17-2011
Submitted by: DaveSend Email
Rating: 10 of 10

     I bought this boat after purchasing a high performance boat from another company. This kayak is a pleasure to paddle. I am learning the finer points of handling in it and it is forgiving of worm mistakes. The boat will edge very well making learning strokes pleasurable. Very stable and fun in the wind and waves. The boat has respectable speed and stability using a high angle stroke.

I would recommend this to anyone looking for a moderate performance kayak. The plastic on this boat will take abuse and still retain its good looks. Boat stays dry and the seating is adjustable plus comfortable.
I am purchasing the 14-5 based on the the performance of this kayak.

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08-20-2008
Submitted by: Send Email
Rating: 10 of 10

     I have been out on my Delta 12.10 about four times now and each time I like this boat more. Previously I had a Necky Zoar which is very stable and comfortable but heavy and difficult for me to car top by myself.

The Delta is light and very maneuverable and tracks true. It is also very durable. I hit a big submerged rock and there wasn't even a scratch. This is a sweet little boat! Good job Delta!

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08-18-2008
Submitted by: Mike ConnerSend Email
Rating: 10 of 10

     Just bought my 12-10 and took it out. I bought the boat having no experience with other kayaks. I sailed small boats all my life. I simply looked at all the boats in this class, asked questions and watched a few videos on kayaks. I then tried 6 other boats in a lesson. I then took my 12-10 out on a river. Wow! I love it. Stable, turns great, easy to get back in after a role, and I got a lot of questions from people with all the other boats. I was especially happy to load this thing on my Yakima incline roof rack. I think it is possible reason your way into a good decision. But buying from REI is 100% guarantee. The boat is everything I was told and what I expected...
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07-07-2008
Submitted by: NfrySend Email
Rating: 10 of 10

     For the last 10 years Iíve owned a 17í 7Ē Current Design Solstice GT which, although a great kayak, was becoming too cumbersome to store, load, and carry (arthritis). Of mixed blessing was its strong tracking with the downside being slow to turn (I edge & never use the rudder). Iíd intended to downsize to a 14í to get into the weight range and storage dimension I was looking for but after much research, inspection, and demos of several kayaks, I paddled a Delta 12.10 (43 lbs.).

Tracking was a pleasant surprise. The 12.10 would exhibit only a slight tendency to yaw with the strongest of strokes, and once edged, will turn on a dime. A look at the underside of the hull viewed from the bow or stern explains why. The boat has a very pronounced keel to aid tracking but once on edge with its semi-hard chine, the keel loses much of its grip and the boat swings around easily. Initial stability is similar to the Solstice GT (good) but the secondary feels more prominent and itís very reluctant to roll beyond its tipping-point.

Also a surprise was the 12.10ís efficiency while paddling straight. It moves through the water with nearly the ease of my old kayak, the noticeable difference being less glide but nothing really bothersome. By contrast, the Current Design Kestral 140 paddles like a barge and would quickly lose momentum when paddling ceased.

Construction and quality of the 12.10 are superb, belying its $1,400 price tag. Reservations about the plastic material vs. composite should be put to rest after watching Deltaís YouTube hammer video and by examining the hull after dragging it across a rocky beach.

Bulkheads fore and aft, secure hatch covers, comfortable cockpit with seatback and fore & aft adjustment, comfortable adjustable foot pegs and thigh braces, perimeter rescue lines, and paddle float rescue straps all add up to one very secure boat to say nothing of the boatís appearance. Many boats of this size are classified as recreational kayaks with the classification implying a lack of serious capabilities. Classifying the 12.10 as such would be a mistake. This boat would more accurately be described as a light touring boat in all respects.

I would urge anyone looking for a smaller sea kayak with most of the capabilities a larger kayak, to demo the 12.10. Youíll likely come away with a big grin.

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07-02-2008
Submitted by: BearSend Email
Rating: 9 of 10

     bought it a couple of months ago. New to kayaking. This boat has great initial stability and secondary stability. Had it out rain or shine in local lakes. Now out on the Puget Sound, handled very well for a high boating day with swells. In fact I learned quite quickly to enjoy them heading straight into them with no problems. Love this boat, tried several others but this on glides through, no heavy plastic barge to paddle. For a small boat feel that it has a lot to offer for advancement without growing out of it to soon!
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09-20-2007
Submitted by: Stewart MidwinterSend Email
Rating: 9 of 10

     My comments are pretty much in line with the previous reviewer's. I also bought a 12.10 a couple of days ago. Prior to buying this boat, I paddled (and have reviewed a few) an Impex Mytic, Necky Looksha Sport, Venture Kayaks Orca 14, Old Town Loon 120 (I own one of these), Delta Fourteen Five, Seaward Cosma TX, Current Designs Kestrel 140, Seaward Passat G3.

I find the 12.10 tracks well, particularly, say, in comparison with the Necky Looksha Sport, while still being maneuverable with body leans or paddle sweeps or draws. In a 20 km/h crosswind, I didn't find any real weathercocking tendency; I have the seat about in the middle of its on-the-water-adjustable range. I don't think this fairly short boat needs a rudder or skeg, and so far I don't miss the lack of one.

I was initially confused on how to adjust the footpegs. I flipped the locking lever arm and tried pulling it or pushing it without success; finally I realized that I had to use my feet or hands to move the pegs and all the lever did was unlock them. Doh!

The molded and padded seat was comfortable, and I appreciated the in-flight adjustable seat-back. I also liked the padded thigh braces. I rolled the boat several times and found it fairly easy; only a little harder than the much narrower Impex Mystic that has rounded chines (21.5" beam versus the 12.10's 25" beam).

The primary stability of this boat is higher than, say, the Mystic, but obviously less than a wide recreational kayak like the OT Loon 120. Due to the hard chines, the secondary stability is great. I felt at ease in the boat.

The hatches were bone-dry after my rolls, and a T-shirt I'd put in the rear was not even slightly wet. The gasket system seems quite good, and the hatches are held down by double bungees.

There's a groove just aft of the cockpit that holds a paddle blade for ease of kayak entry or maybe rescue.

I raced a friend in a Seaward Tyee 17' for a while, and of course he eventually pulled ahead of me. But while we were paddling around a wetland, his longer length didn't confer any advantage, and in fact he was less maneuverable than I was.

The finishing of this boat is superb, and it looks like a much more expensive fiberglass boat. I've heard that the price will go up next year, so grab it while you can! This is a very capable, small, sea kayak that will be ideal for day trips or some overnights on a variety of water conditions.

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06-05-2007
Submitted by: Send Email
Rating: 9 of 10

     Purchased the Delta 12.10 a few weeks ago. I haven't had it out very much -- about five times. Two of those times were on tidal rivers, with wind 15-20mph. The other times were on a very calm lake. I'm 6'2", 220 lbs.

Initial impression: The kayak is very stable -- able to enter and exit easily. Top speed for me was 4.9mph. Able to cruise at around 3.5mph. Tracks very well, and heading into the wind was enjoyable. I felt very confident in the little boat. It's also comfortable -- my legs never cramped, and they have in other kayaks. The only problem encountered were small leaks in both bow and stern compartments. Found an extremely small leak in forward bulkhead which will be simple to repair. Did not see one in stern bulkhead, concluded that stern hatch leaked. It is a large hatch, held in place by bungee cords. Hopefully tightening those cords will help. The boat is very light and easy to cartop. It appears well made, and is quick and responsive. I consider the leaks a minor irritation, and rate it a 9 only because of those leaks. Everything else about it is excellent and I intend to keep it.

I sent several emails regarding leaks to the company. They were very responsive and helpful. I understand a new gasket is being developed, so this problem should be corrected shortly. Having read the horror stories about dealing with some companies, I was very surprised and pleased at this company's response. I would not hesitate to purchase another of their kayaks. In my opinion, a great kayak and a great company.

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